Frequently Asked Questions

What is worship in the Episcopal Church like?

Our worship is experiential, thoughtful, and joyful.  You are invited to participate as you feel led.  As Christians in the Episcopal tradition, our worship is rooted in the Bible and the liturgy of the Book of Common Prayer.  For more than 600 years, the BCP has united Christians all over the world in a common language of prayer and worship.  Some portions of our service come to us from many years before Jesus.  Others come from the early church in the first and second centuries.  The Holy Eucharist is the heart of our worship and guides, nourishes and sustains us in ministry.

How do I know what to do during the service?

The service leaflet handed out for each service provides suggestions about when to sit, stand or kneel as you are able, and the page numbers for the hymns in the blue books (the Hymnal) or the place in the red book (the Book of Common Prayer).  Our service is relaxed and we are not concerned about whether everyone sits or stands at the same time.

What should I wear?

Whatever you like!  At our church you will see people wearing everything from jeans and jerseys to suits and dresses.  We encourage people to wear whatever is comfortable to them.

Why do you call your services the Holy Eucharist?

The Eucharist is another name for Holy Communion.  It is an act of thanksgiving and a remembrance of Jesus’ sacrifice, which was displayed in his radical act of love and self-giving on the cross. The Holy Eucharist is an embodiment and reflection of the unconditional acceptance and love given to us and to which we are called.

Who can receive Communion at your church?

In the Episcopal Church, all baptized Christians and all those who hunger to be transformed by Jesus Christ are welcome to receive communion.  You do not have to be an Episcopalian to receive Communion.  If you would like to be baptized, please speak to Father Mark.

Can I just receive a blessing instead of taking Communion?

Absolutely.  Please proceed to the altar and cross your arms in front of your chest to indicate to the priest that you would like a blessing.

Must I receive both Bread and Wine?

No, you do not have to.  You may receive just bread.

Is there something for my children to do on Sundays?

Yes!  We have a professionally staffed nursery from 9:45 am to 11:15 am and Sunday School for children from pre-K through 4th grade at 9:45 a.m.  Cornerstone, our youth group, meets on Sunday afternoons.

I have a lot of questions and doubts.  Will I feel uncomfortable?

No one has all the answers.  We welcome you wherever you are in your faith journey.

Is your church diverse?

Yes.  Our congregation is made up of people of various nationalities, ages, occupations, sexual orientations and come from a variety of religious traditions.  We have found at Christ Church a spiritual home where we can hear and share the Word of God.  We value Jesus’ teaching of all-inclusive, non-judgmental love.  We are nourishing bodies, minds, and spirits; providing a safe place for renewal and recovery; and cultivating faith through meaningful relationships.  Christ Church is a welcoming and affirming church.

Is your building accessible for persons with disabilities?

Yes, our building is accessible.

What is a Rector?

A Rector is the same thing as a senior pastor and is the priest in charge of a parish.

Why are you called a parish?

In English canon law, a parish was an area under the spiritual care of a priest.  Today, it refers to a self-supporting congregation.  When the Church of England first established the Anglican Church (which is the larger network of churches to which the Episcopal Church belongs) it organized churches according to geographic regions.  Our parish was officially organized in 1632 on the south end of what became known as the Isle of Kent.  We are now officially known as Christ Church Parish, Kent Island.  We sometimes shorten that to CCPKI.

What does “Episcopal” mean?

Episcopal refers to a church with bishops.  Read more about the Episcopal Church here.

Are Episcopalians “born again?”

Yes, although most Episcopalians do not view their rebirth as a sudden, one-time experience.  We tend to speak of a lifelong journey walking in the way of Jesus Christ.  We see all of our lives as a constant striving to accept and follow Christ through corporate worship, the sacraments, private prayer, and our daily living at work, home, community.

What is the lectionary?

The lectionary is a three-year cycle of Bible readings that teach us the Christian faith.  Each Sunday there is a reading from the Old Testament, the book of Psalms, one of the Epistles (letters to the early church), and a reading from one of the four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John).  Click here to see the upcoming readings.

Have any more questions?

Please feel free to ask Father Mark.